Prayer - Spirituality for the long haul

"If prayer stands as the place where God and human beings meet, then I must learn about prayer." - Philip Yancey

Taste and See EventPrayer is at the centre of the spiritual life of a Christian. It is connecting and communicating with God. It is the essence of our relationship with God. Prayer is a privilege, not a duty. Like all good things it requires some discipline. The Anglican Book of Alternative Services and the Book of Common Prayer provide many useful prayer resources for corporate prayer in worship services and personal prayer.

Types of Christian Prayer beyond worship services there are as many ways of praying as there are individuals.

Prayer resources and locations
Resources throughout our Diocese help you explore different aspects of prayer.

Prayer Resources


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Varied Forms of Prayer and Locations
There are many resources and places in the Diocese that are available to explore and take part in varied forms of prayer. A sampling of these resources and locations are listed herein. If you know of others that we could include on this website you are invited to inform Paul Dumbrille at afp@ottawa.anglican.ca.

Christian Meditation
The ancient tradition of Christian Meditation prayer is rooted in the Gospels and the early Christian monastic tradition of the Desert. Many groups and individuals use John Main's Opening Prayer and Laurence Freeman's closing prayer for meditation. Meditation helps people of all ages and cultures to find a simple, practical and meaningful way to awaken and deepen their spiritual life.

Meditation leads to compassionate action. There are many examples of this and how meditators around the world have found meditation making an impact on their lives and relationships.

Christian meditation groups meet in many churches and places in our area. To identify locations where groups practice Christian Meditation using John Main's teachings click here:

For more information contact Flora Benoit, 613-789-7138, florab@sympatico.ca.

Christian meditation Groups meet in many churches and places in our area. To identify locations where groups practice Christian Meditation using John main's teachings click here:

·  St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church, Ottawa

·  St. Richard's Anglican Church, Nepean

·  St. James Anglican Church, Morrisburg

·  Saint Paul University in the main chapel of the University, in the Laframboise building,
   September until the end of May.
   Coordinated by Rev. Kevin Flynn, Director, Anglican Studies Program/Coordonnateur
   des Études Anglicanes Saint Paul University, 223 Main Street Ottawa, ON K1S 1C4,
   613-236-1393, ext. 2427.

For more information contact Flora Benoit, 613-789-7138, florab@sympatico.ca

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Centering Prayer
There are several ongoing Centering Prayer Groups in the Diocese that are part of the Contemplative Outreach, which is a network of individuals and small faith communities committed to living the contemplative dimension of the Gospel. The common desire for Divine transformation, primarily expressed through a commitment to a daily Centering Prayer practice, unites our international, interdenominational community. More can be learned on this form of prayer at www.contemplativeoutreach.org.

There are currently 8 ongoing Centering Prayer Groups in the Diocese that are part of the Contemplative Outreach, which is a network of individuals and small faith communities committed to living the contemplative dimension of the Gospel. The common desire for Divine transformation, primarily expressed through a commitment to a daily Centering Prayer practice, unites our international, interdenominational community. More can be learned on this form of prayer at Contemplative Outreach.

There are groups who meet regularly at various times weekly in the following parishes:
·  St Luke's Anglican Church, Ottawa:
·  All Saint's Anglican Church, Westboro:
·  St John the Evangelist Anglican Church, Ottawa:
·  Church of the Ascension Anglican Church, Ottawa
·  Church of the Epiphany Anglican Church:
·  Anglican Parish of Huntley/Carp:
·  Anglican Parish of March:
·  St. John the Baptist, Anglican Church Richmond:

Rev Gregor Sneddon; gregorsneddon@yahoo.ca; 613-235-3416 is the Representative for Contemplative Outreach in Ottawa and he is available to provide further information.

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Prayer Labyrinths
Unlike a maze, the labyrinth is has a single path leading to the center with no loops, cul-de-sacs or forks. They all share the basic features of an entrance or mouth, a single circuitous path and a center or goal. The labyrinth is a universal symbol for the world, with its complications and difficulties, which we experience on our journey through life. The entry to the labyrinth is birth; the center is death and eternal life. In Christian terms, the thread that leads us through life is divine grace. Like any pilgrimage, the labyrinth represents the inner pilgrimage we are called to make to take us to the center of our being.

There are several labyrinths located at or in Anglican churches in our Diocese.



Stations of the Cross
The Stations of the Cross is a popular devotion used by individuals or groups who wish through prayer and reflection to follow Jesus Christ on his way to Calvary. Many Christians practice the devotion, but the Stations holds a special significance among some Anglicans and Roman Catholics. It is one of the most important devotions honouring the passion of Jesus.

What matters most in the Stations of the Cross is to follow Jesus Christ in his passion and to see ourselves mirrored in him. To face life's dark side in ourselves and in our world, we need images of hope, and Jesus offers images of hope in his passion. By accompanying him on the Way of the Cross, we gain his courageous patience and learn to trust in God who delivers us from evil.

There are some variations in the stations that are used in various churches and places. In recent years some variations have been introduced into the traditional devotion. One of these is the addition of a 15th station - the Resurrection of Jesus. Another is a series of scriptural stations, which begin with the Agony of Jesus in Gethsemane and omit some of the traditional non-scriptural stations in favour of incidents mentioned in the gospels. ↑ top

Places Open for Prayer
Many churches are open for prayer, particularly during the daytime. Following is a partial list. Contacting a local church or a location of your choosing will enable you to establish when a specific church or place is open for "drop-ins" to pray.

All Saints Anglican Church, Westboro. The Chapel of the Holy Spirit is opened five days a week (Monday to Friday) from 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. for meditation and prayer. The main door of the Chapel opens onto Richmond Street. The door is opened at noon, music is played in the Chapel sometimes depending on the volunteer, and a candle is lit at the front of the Chapel.

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Useful Links
Anglican Fellowship of Prayer Canada: www.anglicanprayer.org
Contemplative Prayer: www.contemplativeoutreach.org
Christian Meditation: www.wccm.org
Taizé Ottawa: www.taizeottawa.ca ↑ top



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